Welcome


I completed my Ph.D. in theoretical ecology at the Department of Biology at Lund University in 2011. Prior to my Ph.D. I studied computer science, mathematics, physics and graduated with a M.Sc. thesis in theoretical and mathematical ecology from the Technical University of Denmark. This background have given me a unique combination of extremely strong quantitative skills along with classical ecology, which enables me to make ecologically realistic models even though they may require rather sophisticated mathematics and/or development of complex software solutions.

I am a theoretical and mathematical ecologist working with fundamental and applied research. I completed my Ph.D. in theoretical ecology at the Department of Biology at Lund University in 2011. Prior to my Ph.D. I studied computer science, mathematics, physics and graduated with a M.Sc. thesis in theoretical and mathematical ecology from the Technical University of Denmark. This background have given me a unique combination of extremely strong quantitative skills along with classical ecology, which enables me to make ecologically realistic models even though they may require rather sophisticated mathematics and/or development of complex software solutions.

I work on contributing to theory that summarises and synthesises our understanding of ecological systems. Thinking that we can ever examine every single species and system on our planet is an utopic idea. Hence we need ecological theory that can provide a baseline description of complex ecological systems. I e.g. work on making a general theory for food webs where the ideas of species identity and other taxonomic groups are thrown away and replaced with traits such as e.g. body size and habitat location: For a predator-prey interaction to occur (in most systems) the prey clearly needs to be of a suitable size while the predator and prey naturally also most co-occur. In my research I take the individual as the natural starting point for understanding nature, as it is individuals and not populations or species that interact. It is evident that individuals most be the starting point as individual-level processes such as metabolic rate, locomotion rates, maximum consumption rates etc. are determined by individual body mass, and as trophic roles of individuals depends on body size for many species throughout their life-history: just think of the different ecological roles of fish larvae (1mg) and adult fishes (several kg).

However, theory is not very useful if it does not help us to understand details of particular systems. Therefore I also do research where I apply general models and extend them to include particularities of specific systems such that we can assess their current status and evaluate management and mitigation strategies. I have e.g. been working on developing spatial ecosystem indicators and analysed spatial differences in current status and historical development of the North Sea ecosystem.

I currently work in two research groups. At the Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, and at the Systemic Conservation Biology group at University Göttingen I work on a personal grant from the Villum Foundation.